Cycling – Track

Track Cycling is one of the four disciplines of the Olympic sport of Cycling.

Did you know?

Track Cycling was first held indoors at the Olympic Games for the first time in Montreal 1976.

Key facts

Venue: Velodrome
Dates: Thursday 2 – Tuesday 7 August
Gold medals up for grabs:
10 (5 men, 5 women)
Athletes:
188 (104 men, 84 women)

Track Cycling: a history of the sport

As early as 1870, track races in England were regularly attracting large crowds. The riders competed on wooden indoor tracks that closely resembled the modern velodromes of today. Such tracks ensured the event could be competed all year round.

For more information on the history of the sport visit the IOC website.

Track Cycling at the Olympic Games

Alongside Road Cycling, Track Cycling has been part of the Olympic programme since the first modern Games in Athens in 1896. It has featured in every Games apart from Stockholm 1912.

The first women’s Track events were held in Seoul 1988.

How the competition runs

In the Velodrome, track riders race anti-clockwise around a banked, 250-metre indoor track. There are a number of different events and distances that test speed, endurance and team work. Races are contested both individually and in teams, against the clock and head to head.

Jargon buster

  • Attack: A sudden acceleration to move ahead of another rider or group of riders.
  • Break/breakaway: A rider or group of riders that has left the main group behind.
  • Repechage: A round (usually in sprint competitions) in which losers of previous heats race against each other to get back into the competition.
  • Velodrome: A smooth-surfaced banked bicycle racing track.

Get involved

Cycling is a great way to keep fit, as well as an environmentally-friendly means of transport.

British Cycling’s club development programme, called Go-Ride, is aimed at encouraging clubs to help young cyclists enjoy their cycling in a safe, off-road environment.

For more information, see British Cycling and Union Cycliste Internationale.

Bradley Wiggins of Great Britain breaks an Olympic record with a time of 4:15.031 while qualifying for the men's Indivdual Pursuit during the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games

~ by superbowlnyc on February 17, 2011.

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